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Baked Yuca Fries (Cassava Fries)

Baked yuca fries are golden and crispy on the outside and soft on the inside. They’re a healthier way to make yuca fries and served up with cilantro lime mayonnaise.

Baked yuca fries (also known as cassava fries) are golden and crispy on the outside and soft on the inside. They're a healthier way to make yuca fries and I'm serving them up with cilantro lime mayonnaise. 

Today’s yuca fries are inspired by Latin America and later this week you’ll see some Mexican-inspired dishes. Clearly, my feet are getting itchy for travel and some sort of global exploration.

It’s been a while since my last adventure and when I get a little antsy, that comes through in my food. Because food, like music, has a way of transporting you to a certain time and place. And right now, a little mental transportation will have to suffice until my website redesign is done and I can do the physical, hop on a plane transportation (fingers crossed that’s soon!).

If you’ve never traveled Central or South America, yuca may be new to you. But if you’ve been following this blog for a while, you’ve likely heard me talk about cassava.

And guess what? Yuca and cassava (and manioc) are all one and the same. When processed, this root vegetable is turned into cassava flour. And when processed further, it’s turned into tapioca flour. Yep, it’s one big happy tuber family.

So as you can see, yuca fries could also be known as cassava fries.

Baked yuca fries (also known as cassava fries) are golden and crispy on the outside and soft on the inside. They're a healthier way to make yuca fries and I'm serving them up with cilantro lime mayonnaise. 

Baked yuca fries (also known as cassava fries) are golden and crispy on the outside and soft on the inside. They're a healthier way to make yuca fries and I'm serving them up with cilantro lime mayonnaise. 

So what exactly is yuca? It’s a brown, oblong root vegetable that let’s be honest, has a little bit of a PR problem in the veggie aisle. It’s not the prettiest and when you purchase it in the US, it usually has a thick, waxy coating. But this coating is to protect and preserve the tuber. Good news though, it easily peels off just like a potato.

Yuca is pronounced YOU-ka. Not to be confused with yucca, pronounced YUCK-a. Markets in the US typically misspell yuca for yucca, but yucca is a tall, spiky ornamental plant grown in the Southwest US. And not something you want to be eating.

Because yuca is a starchy tuber, it can be used similarly to potatoes in many recipes. Translation: swap french fries for delicious yuca fries.

So let’s chat about these fries. When I make my yuca fries I tend to cut them thicker than I would a potato. So they’re more like batons rather than fries. I find that this allows them to get crispy and golden on the outside, but stay soft and fluffy on the inside.

Baked yuca fries (also known as cassava fries) are golden and crispy on the outside and soft on the inside. They're a healthier way to make yuca fries and I'm serving them up with cilantro lime mayonnaise. 

Baked yuca fries (also known as cassava fries) are golden and crispy on the outside and soft on the inside. They're a healthier way to make yuca fries and I'm serving them up with cilantro lime mayonnaise. 

Baked yuca fries (also known as cassava fries) are golden and crispy on the outside and soft on the inside. They're a healthier way to make yuca fries and I'm serving them up with cilantro lime mayonnaise. 

Then, you need to boil the cut fries before baking them. Yuca is more dense and firm than potatoes, so without boiling you’d have a crispy outside and hard (pretty much unpalatable) inside. Boiling also creates those frayed edges on the fries that get super yummy and crispy when baked.

Today, I’ve paired these yuca fries with a cilantro lime mayonnaise that’s ah-ma-zing, starting with my Homemade Mayonnaise recipe. I think you’ll definitely be double dipping into that.

So give yuca a whirl. You can hop on a plane to Latin America (my preference), or you can make these yuca fries at home. But either way, I think you’ll soon be loving this tasty root vegetable.

For other healthy munchies and snacks, make sure to check out my Herbed Cassava Tortilla Chips, Curly Sweet Potato Fries, Baked Plantain Chips, 3-Minute Hummus and Ultimate Seed Crackers.

Enjoy!

Baked yuca fries (also known as cassava fries) are golden and crispy on the outside and soft on the inside. They're a healthier way to make yuca fries and I'm serving them up with cilantro lime mayonnaise. 

Did you make this recipe?

Yuca Fries (Cassava Fries)

These baked yuca fries are golden and crispy on the outside and soft on the inside. A tasty and healthier way to make yuca fries, rather than frying.

Ingredients

yuca fries

  • 2 yuca (cassava)
  • 1 tbsp avocado oil
  • pinch of sea salt

cilantro lime mayonnaise

  • 1/2 cup (packed) fresh cilantro leaves
  • 2 tbsp fresh lime juice
  • 1 tsp Dijon mustard
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 1 cup mayonnaise

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees fahrenheit and bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.
  2. Use a vegetable peeler to peel the outside waxy layer from the yuca (just as you would a potato).
  3. If the yuca is long, slice it in half, then slice into 1/2″-3/4″ fries or batons.
  4. Add the fries to the boiling water and cook for 10-15 minutes, or until the edges start to fray and they’re fork tender.
  5. Drain the fries and place in a large bowl. Drizzle them with avocado oil and sea salt and toss to coat.
  6. Lay the fries in a single layer on a baking tray and cook in the oven for 30-35 minutes, flipping halfway through.
  7. While the fries are cooking, make the cilantro lime mayonnaise. Add all of the ingredients except the mayonnaise to a small food processor and blend until finely chopped. Then add the mayonnaise and pulse a couple of times to combine.
  8. Serve the yuca fries immediately with the cilantro lime mayonnaise.

Lisa's Tips

Try to cut your fries into a fairly even and uniform shape. If they get thinner at the ends (like mine), the ends will crisp up first.

The yuca should be white on the inside. If it has many brown streaks, it may be past it’s prime and you’ll want to discard that one.

Nutrition Information

Yield: 4 servings, Serving Size: 1/4 of recipe

  • Amount Per Serving:
  • Calories: 738.9
  • Total Fat: 45.2g
  • Saturated Fat: 7g
  • Cholesterol: 23.1mg
  • Sodium: 445.5mg
  • Carbohydrates: 80.2g
  • Fiber: 3.9g
  • Sugar: 4.2g
All images and text ©Lisa Bryan for Downshiftology

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19 comments on “Baked Yuca Fries (Cassava Fries)”

  1. Hi Lisa,

    I tried the yuca fries for the first time today. First time using yuca for anything too! I’m afraid I seem to have cut them too thin, as mine were dry after baking. I did not miss out the boiling part either. So, tip for others and note to self – read the article/recipe fully and note the voice of experience’s advice! 

    I really liked the Lime Cilantro Mayo, I was thankful for it as excessive dipping of the fries helped. 

    It hasn’t put me off, I will try again as yuca is not expensive.  Thanks again for more fresh ideas :)

  2. About those frayed edges – you’ll get them if you cut them across the grain, widthwise, and not it you cut them with the grain, lengthwise. I had pieces cut both ways, so it was very clear the difference. Both delish!

  3. Made the fries last night but was too lazy to make the dressing. I served them with ketchup. Chatting with my husband, I grabbed one, took a bite and was jaw dropped. Fabulous! Could not stop eating them. Better than potato fries, in my opinion. They remain crisp on the outside and soft on the inside even in Florida heat and humidity. A real winner. Wow! Thank you!

  4. Pingback: 5 Things You Need to Know About Cassava Flour

  5. I need to look for yuca in my town because these fries look and sound awesome!

  6. yucca fries are my absolute favorite!! i’ve never tried baking them though…need to try!

  7. How very interesting. It becomes tapioca flour. I use that. Your fries look really good too!

  8. what a great idea to make yuca fries… I have got to try this.. and the cilantro lime mayo sounds amazing

  9. I love yuca and the cilantro lime dressing is the winner. Thanks for sharing.

  10. LOVE Yuca Fries! Great recipe and inspiration here (as always).