Paleo Zucchini Bread

Paleo zucchini bread is delicious, moist and flavorful. And unlike most paleo zucchini bread recipes, it’s not overly dense. It’s a tasty way to use up all your in season zucchini and give a nutrient boost to bread.

Paleo zucchini bread on a table with two slices from the loaf.

The Best Paleo Zucchini Bread

Are you ready for the best paleo zucchini bread you’ve ever tasted? When it’s zucchini season it’s an absolute must to whip up a loaf of this bread. It’s gluten-free and grain-free, using my usual triumvirate of flours (almond flour, tapioca flour and coconut flour) for the perfect texture. And if there’s any doubts on why three flours are necessary, just read all the comments on my reader favorite paleo chocolate cake recipe.

This paleo zucchini bread is virtually identical to my gluten-free zucchini bread recipe, but so many readers didn’t realize that recipe was also paleo-friendly, so I’ve posted this updated version today (with just a few minor tweaks).

Paleo Zucchini Bread Recipe Video

Are you ready to make the tastiest paleo zucchini bread? It’s an easy recipe to make, but if it’s your first time I recommend you watch this step-by-step tutorial video. Give it a watch below!

Paleo Zucchini Bread Ingredients

Want to know what’s in this recipe? Just a handful of simple ingredients, including:

  • Dry Ingredients: My flour blend of almond flour, tapioca flour and coconut flour, plus baking soda, cinnamon and salt.
  • Wet Ingredients: A few fridge and pantry staples including eggs, applesauce, maple syrup, apple cider vinegar….and of course zucchini!

Paleo zucchini bread on a table with a knife and two slices.

Two slices of paleo zucchini bread on a plate.

Extra Recipe Tips

One thing you should note, I’ve kept kept the maple syrup to a minimum in this recipe. That means you could easily use this recipe for both sweet and savory options. But if you’d like a sweeter bread, you could certainly increase the maple syrup by 1-2 tablespoons. And if you’d like a much sweeter bread, you definitely need to whip up my chocolate zucchini bread.

This is a quick bread recipe (similar to my paleo banana bread and paleo pumpkin bread recipes) so it will naturally be a thicker bread than sandwich bread.

On my Summer Meal Prep video I show you a few ways to get creative with your paleo zucchini bread recipe. Of course you can eat it plain or top it with butter. But you can also top it with a variety of other ingredients for a delicious, healthy and creative breakfast or lunch option. Enjoy!

More Delicious Zucchini Recipes

When zucchini is in abundance you’ve got lots of options for delicious zucchini recipes!

Want another “green” bread recipe? Try my Falafel Flatbread – it’s incredibly unique and versatile. You’ll love it!

Two slices of paleo zucchini bread with butter spread on top.

Two slices of paleo zucchini bread on a white plate.

Best Paleo Zucchini Bread (gluten-free, dairy-free)

4.94 from 96 votes
Prep Time: 15 mins
Cook Time: 1 hr
Total Time: 1 hr 15 mins
Servings: 12 servings
Author: Lisa Bryan
This super moist paleo zucchini bread recipe is made with almond flour, tapioca flour and coconut flour. It's gluten-free, grain-free, dairy-free and extremely delicious. Watch the video above to see how quickly it comes together!

Ingredients

Dry Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups almond flour
  • 1/2 cup tapioca flour
  • 1/4 cup coconut flour
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp salt

Wet Ingredients

  • 3 eggs
  • 1/2 cup applesauce
  • 2 tbsp maple syrup
  • 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • 1 1/2 cups grated zucchini

Instructions 

  • Preheat the oven to 350 degrees fahrenheit.
  • Add all of the dry ingredients to a mixing bowl and stir until combined.
  • In a separate bowl add the eggs, applesauce, maple syrup, and apple cider vinegar and whisk together. Squeeze the grated zucchini in a nut milk bag or kitchen towel to remove the excess water. Then add the grated zucchini to the wet ingredients and stir to combine.
  • Pour the wet ingredients into the dry and stir until the batter is well mixed. Pour the batter into a greased 8.5 x 4.5 inch loaf pan.
  • Bake the zucchini bread for 50-60 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean.

Lisa's Tips

  • This is the nut milk bag I use to squeeze the zucchini and I love it. It's great for homemade almond milk as well.

Nutrition

Calories: 144.2kcal, Carbohydrates: 12.9g, Protein: 5.2g, Fat: 8.8g, Saturated Fat: 1.3g, Cholesterol: 46.6mg, Sodium: 123mg, Fiber: 2.8g, Sugar: 4.5g
Course: Appetizer, Breads
Cuisine: American
Keyword: Paleo Zucchini Bread, Paleo Zucchini Bread Recipe
©Downshiftology. Content and photographs are copyright protected. Sharing of this recipe is both encouraged and appreciated. Copying and/or pasting full recipes to any social media is strictly prohibited.
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Recipe originally posted August 2018, but updated to include new information. 

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339 comments on “Paleo Zucchini Bread”

  1. Easy to make, and tastes great. I love it best toasted, great to top with hummus or peanut butter as a side to breakfast or a salad. I would be tempted to play with some seasoning to pop it a bit, like adding nutmeg or cloves with the cinnamon or eliminating the cinnamon and adding Italian seasoning or dill, garlic powder and  onion powder. It more moist than baking a loaf with regular flour, I would highly suggest baking it the full 60 minutes. Thoroughly enjoyed this zucchini bread, it disappeared quickly!5 stars

  2. To Robyn: One other thought – you may want to increase the maple syrup and cinnamon amount to offset any “egginess”.

  3. This in in reply to Robyn, who reported that the bread was very wet and eggy. I’m in the process of perfecting my paleo quick bread recipes, and I am learning from my mistakes. Looking at this recipe (which I will adapt slightly), I would suggest, as Lisa did, that the zucchini may have been too wet. But I do have two other suggestions – the first is to change the leavening to at least 1 tsp baking powder and 1 tsp baking soda. I usually make almond bread recipes with 1 3/4 cups almond flour, and 1/2 cup tapioca flour, and I use 1 1/2 tsp each and get a perfect result, so I’m scaling down a bit due to this recipe being a little smaller. 1 1/4 each might work well also. The second suggestion is to both check your oven for accuracy, and to purchase an electronic probe thermometer. Quick breads can be tricky – often the toothpick will come out clean, but later you find a wet mess or a hole in the middle. Start using the probe when you estimate it is about three quarters done. Don’t open the oven before that. You want the tip of the probe to be in the center of the loaf. When the probe shows 197- 200 degrees, take it out and let it cool. Don’t let it go above 200. One other thought; use a full 5 x 9 pan instead of the 4.5 x 8.5. I found that the quicker cooking eliminated a too-dark bottom and sides of the loaf. Good luck!

  4. Hi! I wonder if I could use bob’s red mill egg replaced in this recipe?

  5. Admittedly, we’re having a real hard time with the elimination diet we’re currently currently doing in my household, so I’m choosing not to give a rating. I don’t want to influence others with my opinion right now. But I did want to say something before others currently in my boat make the same mistake. I found these flat out disgusting. I went ahead and made a double batch because I’m rolling in zucchini from the garden, half in the 8×4 pan as directed and the other half in muffin tins…and I’m really regretting it. Nobody in the house will touch these, and they’re about to be ridiculously expensive dog treats. (The dog gives them 5 stars!)

    I read comments about grain-free treats being “eggy”, and dismissed them because we just love eggs in this house, but I finally understand now. By “eggy” they mean weirdly porridge-like, spongy and wet at the same time.

    I don’t think it’s a recipe fail, though. This might very well be the best that can be done with these types of ingredients and dietary restrictions. I’m so appreciative that you make the effort to try and share recipes like this, putting your reputation on the line. These are probably pure comfort food if you’ve forgotten what traditional baked goods are like. This has been a really difficult adjustment for my corn/wheat loving family, though, and I think these just added to the sadness rather than what I hoped for. I just want people who are new to this to proceed with caution before they waste expensive ingredients, and maybe try half a recipe in muffin tins first?

    • Hi Robyn – thanks for your honest feedback! If this is your first time baking gluten and grain-free, it can be an adjustment for sure. But just for clarification, these should not be porridge-like, spongy or wet in the middle. It sounds like you may have under-baked them and/or not squeezed enough of the liquid out from the zucchini. You can see from the photos that mine are perfectly bread-like in the middle (and it’s why this recipe has received so many rave reviews). Of course, everyone has different tastes, so I hope you enjoy some of my other recipes more!

  6. Hi Lisa, 

    I made your pumpkin bread last week and it was delicious. I want to make this zucchini bread this week, and wanted to know if I could make it in my Nordic-ware heritage loaf pan?  Thanks  

  7. Hi Lisa,

    Could I bake this in a Nordic ware 6 cup pan, one of those with the grooves?

  8. I can’t find the video.

  9. if I am getting ready to shred and freeze zucchini, should I squeeze dry before or wait until ready to use after I thaw it? can’t wait to try. Thanks so much.

  10. It’s been years since experimenting with zucchini. My neighbor have me a huge zucchini from their garden and I ran across this keto friendly recipe. My zucchini bread loaf turned out great, the texture was perfect and it is a wonderful go to for a hurried breakfast. I added 2 to 3 tablespoons of monk fruit sugar to add a little more sweetness. Just love this recipe! Thanks.5 stars

  11. My husband and I love this. I have made it a few times. Today I tried it in muffin tins and it was perfect! Thanks so much.5 stars

    • Happy to hear you and your husband loved this recipe! If you also want a slightly sweeter version, I have a healthy zucchini muffin recipe as well :)

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